What We’re Reading: June 11, 2010

| June 11, 2010 | 2 Comments
whatwerereading061110 What We’re Reading: June 11, 2010

Keep up with what we’re reading!

Each Friday, we share those sites and articles—those interesting links—that we are currently reading or have recently read. Although we’ve been negligent these past few weeks. Enjoy these great posts that you may have missed this past little while. If you have any suggestions for next Friday’s round-up, please contact us!


Breaking News. The 16 year old sailor, Abby Sunderland, who is trying to become the youngest sailor ever to circumnavigate the globe is feared to be lost. Check out the latest here from her parents—who are posting to her blog. [Update: Teen Sailor Abby Sunderland Found Alive; Family is 'Relieved'].

Folie à Deux. Jen Laceda is giving her fantastic blog a content makeover this week. She’s starting to write regular ‘columns’. This week, she’s kicking off the re-write with a “Memories of…” column. She plans to focus on a trip and include her favourite moments and noteworthy information for the traveller. To top it all off, she’s planning to include re-created dishes when possible. She kicks things off this week with “Memories of Athens“. It’s the same great writing—now with more calories!

Travels with Adam. Adam, a graphic designer who left behind a successful job in Boston to travel around the world, posts his thoughts following his first month abroad. He’s in search of creative inspiration, tasty food, different cultures & interesting people — and his blog reflects that!

People are Strange. Dave and Deb check in graveside from the Cemitiere Pere la Chaise in Paris—final resting place of The Doors’ Jim Morrison. Cool beans. Writes Deb: “Over 800,000 souls are buried here and besides Morrison, some of the other famous residents include Chopin, Moliere, Edith Piaf, Rossini and Oscar Wilde.” Check out their post here.

Sending Postcards. Alex and Mina check in from Johannesburg’s Protea Hotel. Themed around an aircraft hangar, Alex and Mina really capture the industrial ambiance of the hotel with pictures of its polished concrete floors, steel finishes, chrome lighting and top to bottom windows. Weird and wonderful.

Cycling Round The World. Russian artist Vladislav Ketov is fulfilling his dream of cycling round the earth’s continental coasts. The 61-year-old traveler is now pedaling the polar circle. He has already left behind Europe, Africa, South and South East Asia, as well as the two Americas—having covered 150 thousand kilometers. The Voice of Russia reports on him here. Or check out his website here.

BootsnAll Threads

BootsnAll is a web-based travel publisher, an online travel community and provider of services and information that travelers need and want. We frequent their forum—and bring to you our favourite threads from the past week!

Money. In the “Around the World and Vagabonding Travel” forum, Jean asked “If money wasn’t a problem what would you do different?“. The Booties weigh in and answers are all over the place—but the consenus? A private bathroom would be nice. Check ‘em out here.

Direction. Is there any benefit to going in one direction over the other? This is a pretty common question among round-the-world travellers. It was recently posed by a fellow Bootie on the BootsnAll forum who wrote: “I know conventional thinking isn’t always the best way to go but I have to ask the question: Is there any benefit to going one direction over the other?” Check out the Booties’ advice. Our opinion? Your personal preference is the most critical component in choosing a direction of travel. It should suit—and complement—your individual needs, interests, hotels preferences and budget. However, we believe that you shouldn’t base your direction on expenses alone, or you might let a few once-in-a-lifetime opportunities escape you! Check out our post on the question here.

Solo Travel. One Bootie, recently back from a solo trip to South Africa writes: “I have loved my first two weeks but kept feeling lonely as a solo backpacker—just starting my nine month long round-the-world trip. Can you give me any suggestions for how to deal with loneliness when most people you see are in couples or groups and you are not?” Felllow Booties weigh in here. Our take? On the road, it’s good to remind yourself of the difference between aloneness and loneliness. And, if the prospect of waking up in a strange place all by yourself concerns you, just remember the words of Freya Stark: “To awaken quite alone in a strange town is one of the pleasantest sensations in the world.” For more tips, check out our post entitled: “How to meet backpackers and influence people“.